New Statement

The relationship between myself and my surroundings is one of the driving forces behind my 
practice. Rebecca Solnit wrote that “environmental problems are really cultural problems.” I’m 
interested in unearthing those cultural blindspots that promote a dysfunctional relationship to 
the environment.

I make art not by creating something new, but by reorganizing what’s already there. I primarily 
use found materials that are widely considered to be worthless, such as plastic bottles, tree  branches, cardboard, and phone books. I make full use of each material’s unique sculptural properties as well as its historical, cultural, and environmental resonances.

My process is resourceful, responsive, and playful. I spend as much time exploring, scavenging for materials, and researching as I do making. I make both public and gallery‐based work, and I learn different things from each.

Words

I recently had to cut my artist statement down to 100 words for an application. It was hard to do, but now I think I like it better.

DO MORE WITH LESS!

I make art not by creating something new, but by reorganizing what’s already there. My process is resourceful, responsive, and playful. I spend as much time exploring and researching as I do making. I respond to my immediate surroundings, especially to found materials, so my work is often tactile and textured. Each material has unique formal properties, as well as historical, cultural, and environmental resonances.

My site and community based work keeps me grounded; I enjoy the challenges of working with and for a diverse audience. When making work for gallery settings, I enjoy greater focus and control.